TherapyMantra

High Functioning ADHD | All About High Functioning ADHD

High Functioning ADHD | All About High Functioning ADHD

Do you often feel like you are living in two worlds? One world is where you are successful, on top of your game, and in control. The other world is a place where everything feels chaotic and out of control. If this sounds like you, then you may be living with high-functioning ADHD. This can be a difficult condition to live with, but it is not impossible to succeed. In this blog post, we will discuss what high-functioning ADHD is and how you can make the most of your abilities!

What Is High Functioning ADHD?

What Is High Functioning ADHD?

High-functioning ADHD is a form of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder that is characterized by many of the same signs and symptoms as other forms of ADHD, but with less severity. People with high-functioning ADHD may have difficulty sustaining attention, be impulsive, and be highly active, but they can function relatively well in school or work and maintain relationships.

While there is no specific cutoff for what qualifies as high-functioning ADHD, it is generally considered to be less impairing than other forms of ADHD. This means that people with high-functioning ADHD can live relatively normal lives and may only need minimal accommodations or support to succeed.

Many famous and successful people have high-functioning ADHD, such as Jamie Oliver, Simon Cowell, and Will Smith. While having high-functioning ADHD can be an advantage in some ways (such as being creative or spontaneous), it can also be a challenge. People with high-functioning ADHD may struggle with organization, time management, and following through on tasks.

If you think you or someone you know has high-functioning ADHD, it is important to seek out professional help. A qualified mental health professional can assess for ADHD and guide how to manage symptoms. There are many effective treatments for ADHD, so don’t hesitate to get help if you need it.

Symptoms of High Functioning ADHD?

Symptoms of High Functioning ADHD?

There are many symptoms of high-functioning ADHD. However, these signs of high-functioning ADHD may depend on an individual on different factors that have an impact on their life. The most common symptoms include:

Being Easily Distracted

One of the most important symptoms of High functioning ADHD is the inability to focus. It is very common for people with this disorder to get sidetracked and struggle to pay attention when they are supposed to be focusing on a task. This can make it difficult to finish projects, follow through on commitments, or pay attention in class or during meetings.

Impulsivity

People with high-functioning ADHD may also be impulsive. This means that they may act without thinking or have difficulty controlling their impulses. For example, they may say something without thinking about how it will affect others, blurt out answers before hearing the whole question, or interrupts conversations frequently.

Hyperactivity

Hyperactivity is another common symptom of high-functioning ADHD. This means that people with this disorder may feel restless or have difficulty sitting still. They may pace, fidget, or squirm when they are supposed to be paying attention or sitting still. This can make it hard to focus on tasks or stay on task.

Having Trouble Sustaining Attention On One Task

Sometimes people with high-functioning ADHD can have trouble sustaining their attention on one task. This is different from being easily distracted. It means that people with this disorder may have difficulty focusing for long periods, even if they are interested in the task. For example, they may start a project but have trouble seeing it through to the end.

Disorganization

High-functioning ADHD can also make it difficult to stay organized. People with this disorder may have trouble keeping track of their belongings, meeting deadlines, or staying on top of their work. This can lead to lost items, missed appointments, and unfinished projects.

Procrastination

Procrastination is another common symptom of high-functioning ADHD. People with this disorder may have difficulty getting started on tasks or may put off tasks that they don’t want to do. This can make it hard to meet deadlines or complete projects.

Moodiness

People with high-functioning ADHD may also experience mood swings. This means that their mood can change quickly and without warning. For example, they may be happy one minute and angry the next. These mood swings can be difficult for others to deal with and can make it hard to maintain relationships.

Struggling With Organization

Another common symptom of high-functioning ADHD is struggling with organization. This means that people with this disorder may have trouble keeping track of their belongings, meeting deadlines, or staying on top of their work. This can lead to lost items, missed appointments, and unfinished projects.

Constant Movement

Another common symptom of high-functioning ADHD is constant movement. This means that people with this disorder may pace, fidget, or squirm when they are supposed to be paying attention or sitting still. This can make it hard to focus on tasks or stay on task. Also, people with high-functioning ADHD may have trouble sleeping because they can’t seem to slow down their minds or bodies.

Interrupting Others

People with high-functioning ADHD may also interrupt others frequently. This can be frustrating for those around them and can make it difficult to have a conversation or maintain a relationship. Interrupting others can be a symptom of impulsivity or hyperactivity, both of which are common in people with high-functioning ADHD.

Losing Things

Another common symptom of high-functioning ADHD is losing things. This can be frustrating and can lead to lost work, missed deadlines, and wasted time. People with high-functioning ADHD may lose their possessions, such as keys or wallets, or they may lose track of important papers or projects.

Daydreaming

People with high-functioning ADHD may also find that they daydream often. This means that they may have trouble focusing on the task at hand because their minds are constantly wandering. Daydreaming can make it difficult to pay attention in class or during meetings, and it can make it hard to stay on task.

Trouble With Time Management

People with high-functioning ADHD may also have trouble with time management. This means that they may have difficulty keeping track of time, meeting deadlines, or completing projects on time. This can lead to lost items, missed appointments, and unfinished projects.

Forgetfulness

People with high-functioning ADHD may also find that they forget things often. This can be frustrating and can lead to lost work, missed deadlines, and wasted time. People with high-functioning ADHD may forget their possessions, such as keys or wallets, or they may forget important papers or projects.

Intolerance of Failure

People with high-functioning ADHD may also have a hard time dealing with failure. This means that they may get easily frustrated or give up when faced with a difficult task. This can make it hard to complete projects or meet deadlines. Intolerance of failure can also lead to low self-esteem and anxiety.

Difficulty With Change

Sometimes, people with high-functioning ADHD may have difficulty dealing with change. This means that they may resist or become overwhelmed by change. This can make it hard to adapt to new situations or to handle unexpected events. Difficulty with change can also lead to anxiety and stress.’

Causes of High-Functioning ADHD

Causes of High-Functioning ADHD

Like signs, there are some causes of high-functioning ADHD, such as:

Genetics

Research suggests that children with ADHD are more likely to have a family member with the condition. So, genetics may play a role in causing high-functioning ADHD. These genetics make it more likely for a person to develop the impulsivity, inattention, and hyperactivity that are characteristic of ADHD.

Environmental Factors

Some environmental factors may contribute to high-functioning ADHD. For example, exposure to lead has been linked to an increased risk of developing ADHD. Also, research suggests that smoking during pregnancy may be a risk factor for having a child with ADHD.

Some of these environmental factors are beyond a person’s control. However, there are also some that a person can do something about. For example, if you’re pregnant, quitting smoking may help reduce your child’s risk of developing ADHD.

Brain Structure and Function

There are differences in the brains of people with high-functioning ADHD. For example, they may have smaller brains overall. They may also have less activity in certain brain regions. These differences may make it more likely for someone to develop symptoms of ADHD.

Sometimes, these differences in brain structure and function can be seen on brain scans. However, it’s important to note that these changes are usually subtle. They may not be obvious to someone looking at the scan.

Neurotransmitters are chemicals that carry messages between nerve cells in the brain. Some research suggests that people with ADHD may have differences in certain neurotransmitters. This includes a shortage of norepinephrine and dopamine. These neurotransmitters play important roles in attention, focus, and impulsivity. These differences may contribute to the development of ADHD.

It’s important to note that there is no single cause of high-functioning ADHD. Rather, it’s likely that a combination of factors contributes to the development of the condition.

Diagnosing High-Functioning ADHD

If you think you or your child may have high-functioning ADHD, it’s important to see a doctor. A doctor can help rule out other conditions with similar symptoms and make a diagnosis.

To diagnose high-functioning ADHD, a doctor will likely:

  • Conduct a physical exam. This can help rule out other conditions that may cause similar symptoms.
  • Ask about your medical history. The doctor will ask about your symptoms and when they began. They may also ask about your family’s medical history.
  • Conduct tests. The doctor may order tests, such as blood tests or brain scans, to rule out other conditions.

Make a referral. If the doctor suspects you or your child has high-functioning ADHD, they may refer you to a mental health professional, such as a psychologist or psychiatrist. This specialist can conduct additional evaluations to confirm the diagnosis.

Treating High-Functioning ADHD

Treating High-Functioning ADHD

There is no single treatment for high-functioning ADHD. Rather, treatment typically involves a combination of medication and therapy. The goal of treatment is to help reduce symptoms and improve functioning.

Medication

Medication is often used to treat this type of  ADHD. The most common type of medication used is stimulants. These include drugs like methylphenidate (Ritalin) and amphetamines (Adderall). Stimulants help improve focus and concentration. They may also help reduce impulsivity and hyperactivity.

Not everyone responds to stimulants in the same way. Some people may find that they work well, while others may not. If stimulants don’t work or have unacceptable side effects, other types of medication may be used. These include antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications, and antipsychotics.

Therapy

Therapy is another important part of treatment for high-functioning ADHD. It can help you or your child learn strategies for managing symptoms. It can also help with emotional difficulties that may be related to ADHD.

Different types of therapy can be effective for treating high-functioning ADHD. These include cognitive-behavioral therapy, behavioral therapy, and family therapy. These therapies can help you or your child learn new skills and ways of thinking about ADHD.

Self-Care

In addition to medication and therapy, self-care is an important part of treatment for this type of ADHD. There are things you can do at home to help reduce symptoms and improve functioning.

Some self-care strategies that may be helpful include:

Getting regular exercise. Exercise can help improve focus, concentration, and energy levels. It can also help reduce stress and anxiety.

Eating a healthy diet. Eating healthy foods can help improve focus and energy levels. It’s also important to avoid sugary and processed foods, which can make symptoms worse.

Getting enough sleep. Sleep is important for overall health and well-being. People with ADHD may have difficulty sleeping, which can make symptoms worse. aim to get 7-8 hours of sleep each night.

Practicing relaxation techniques. Relaxation techniques, such as meditation and yoga, can help reduce stress and anxiety.

Setting up a routine. Having a set daily routine can help improve focus and concentration. It can also help reduce impulsivity and hyperactivity.

Creating a support system. Talking to friends or family members about your ADHD can help you feel supported and understood. You may also want to join a support group for people with ADHD.

High-functioning ADHD can be a challenge, but there are things you can do to manage symptoms and improve functioning. With treatment,

Support Groups

Support Groups are a great way to meet other people who are going through similar experiences. You can share your experiences, give and receive support, and learn from others.

Some people with this type of ADHD find it helpful to join a support group. This can be a great way to meet other people who are going through similar experiences. You can share your experiences, give and receive support, and learn from others. There are many online and in-person support groups available.

Conclusion

One of the most important things to remember when it comes to this type of ADHD is that every individual is different. What works for one person may not work for another. The best way to manage ADHD is by finding what works specifically for you and then sticking to that plan. Staying organized and on track can be difficult for people with ADHD, but it is important to try your best and not get discouraged. Remember, even small steps can make a big difference.

If you think you might have high-functioning ADHD, or if your symptoms are causing problems in your life, talk to your doctor.

Hope this article was of help to you! If you are suffering from mental health disorders, you may seek help from Therapy Mantra. We have a team of highly trained and experienced therapists who can provide you with the tools and skills necessary for overcoming mental health disorders. Contact us today to schedule an online therapy or download our free Android or iOS app for more information.